arcticdiscos:

 Sylvia Plath. 1932-1963
 “I can never read all the books I want; I can never be all the people I  want and live all the lives I want. I can never train myself in all the  skills I want. And why do I want? I want to live and feel all the shades,  tones and variations of mental and physical experience possible in  life. And I am horribly limited.” 

arcticdiscos:

 Sylvia Plath. 1932-1963

 “I can never read all the books I want; I can never be all the people I  want and live all the lives I want. I can never train myself in all the  skills I want. And why do I want? I want to live and feel all the shades,  tones and variations of mental and physical experience possible in  life. And I am horribly limited.” 

themusingsofacurlyhairednerd:

Nothing can compare to books and writing while it’s raining.

obstreperous-honey:

encontrate:

thisispureinsanity:

candlejack:



WHAT IS THIS
WHAT IS THIS
WHAT
IS THIS A LIBRARY IN A THEATRE
ALL OF MY DREAMS HAVE JUST COME TRUE


oh. oh my god.

this is genuinely the most beautiful thing i have ever seen

This is a book store called El Ateneo in Buenos Aires, Argentina! You can have coffee while sitting on the stage. One of my favorite places in my city.

It’s a BOOKSTORE?!

obstreperous-honey:

encontrate:

thisispureinsanity:

candlejack:

WHAT IS THIS

WHAT IS THIS

WHAT

IS THIS A LIBRARY IN A THEATRE

ALL OF MY DREAMS HAVE JUST COME TRUE

oh. oh my god.

this is genuinely the most beautiful thing i have ever seen

This is a book store called El Ateneo in Buenos Aires, Argentina! You can have coffee while sitting on the stage. One of my favorite places in my city.

It’s a BOOKSTORE?!

image

"I am often asked why I write fiction for children. Because I am still a child. Because the world is big, and the world is wonderful, but it is also terrifying. It is an ocean full of paper boats. And for many children, the only nobility, the only joy, the only strength and sacrifice that they see first-hand - that they see enfleshed - comes in fiction."

N.D. Wilson, Death by Living (2013)

robinlafevers:

rj-anderson:

lyzzystardust:

the-noir-gentleman:

Inside “Lello & Irmão” book shop in Porto, Portugal

i must take my wife here

NGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHH *falls over and lies on floor twitching*

I would need to pack food and water for a month, just to be able to set foot in there because I WOULD NEVER WANT TO LEAVE.

I could barely make it to the end of this set b/c OVERSTIMULATION. *faints*

"It’s a shame when I hear an intelligent adult say, “Well I’m not a young person so it’s not for me.” You were a young person. And you like a good book. Then there is a great YA book out there for you."

The Saturday Rumpus Interview with Cecil Castellucci, author, performer, librettist. This interview provides us with yet another reason to love Madeleine L’Engle…read on for more! (via yahighway)

emptylighters:

str8forzuko:

like you’re basically worthless if you don’t like to read and this weird little culture kind of ignores that some people really struggle with reading/can’t read at all

  1. not everybody has access to books.  there was a study done that showed 1 book per every 300 low income children.  books cost money.  books cost time.  reading isn’t going to be a priority if you’re low on these two resources.
  2. learning disabilities are a thing that exist.  i used to love to read when i was a kid, before I developed a mental illness that sometimes functions as a learning disability and makes it so difficult to read books that it often frustrates me to the point of tears and i’ve finished probably one whole book in the past 2 years.  many, many learning disabilities specifically affect reading, and you don’t know just by looking at someone whether they have one of these disabilities.
  3. people learn in different ways.  you might be really good at grammar (whoopdefuckindoo) and somebody else might spend all their time watching the news and know everything about current events.  maybe that person you think is “milkshake” because they said they didn’t like reading is an amazing artist.  maybe you suck at art. you never know

1. Libraries exist. (And this is why they should continue to exist.) Free books, thousands of them, accessible by anyone!

2. Yes, learning disabilities are a problem for some people. My husband is dyslexic, so reading anything longer than a news article is incredibly frustrating for him; he just isn’t able to process or retain it. However, he is an excellent auditory learner, so… audiobooks! If I read a book I love, whether fiction or nonfiction, I can share it with him by digging up an audiobook version through our magical public library system. Libraries aren’t just for bookworms.

3. Yes again. Not everyone is a reader/writer/wordsmith and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. However, that’s why there are all sorts of different mediums for storytelling and information-gathering. Hell, for awhile my husband knew more about classic literature than me just because he’d seen all the B&W film adaptations of books in his childhood. (Which his mother checked out at the library on VHS. Boom.) Today, if he wants to learn more about a subject that interests him, he either finds an audiobook or a documentary series focused on it. 

So yeah, reading isn’t for everyone. Agreed. But that doesn’t mean you have to remain isolated from the vast wealth of awesome literature/knowledge out there. In my experience, people interested in these things can always find a way to absorb them, no matter what disabilities might hinder them.

(And yes, they probably kick ass at other things you really suck at.)

  • Person: hey have you read any good books lately?
  • Me: are you ready for this conversation

"Writing and reading decrease our sense of isolation. They deepen and widen and expand our sense of life: they feed the soul. When writers make us shake our heads with the exactness of their prose and their truths, and even make us laugh about ourselves or life, our buoyancy is restored. We are given a shot at dancing with, or at least clapping along with, the absurdity of life, instead of being squashed by it over and over again. It’s like singing on a boat during a terrible storm at sea. You can’t stop the raging storm, but singing can change the hearts and spirits of the people who are together on that ship."

Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life (via excessivebookshelf)